Columbia, SC Summer Camps

Results 1-5 of 5 Find Columbia, SC Summer Camps for kids & teens and choose your summer camp program: day, overnight & specialty featuring traditional camps.
 
Rocky Bottom Camp Of The Blind
Columbia, SC  
Camp Type:
Residential Camp
Activities:
Traditional Camps
Gender:
Coed
 
 
Adventure Camp
Columbia, SC  
Camp Type:
Day Camp
Activities:
Adventure Camps: Hiking
Gender:
Coed
 
 
Camp Cu
Columbia, SC  
Camp Type:
Day Camp
Activities:
Arts Camps: Photography and Video
Gender:
Coed
 
 
Developmental To Personal Development
Columbia, SC  
Camp Type:
Day Camp
Activities:
Sports Camps: Volleyball
Gender:
Coed
 
 
Fast Forward Environmental Summer
Columbia, SC  

Fast Forward Environmental Summer Camp...

Camp Type:
Day Camp
Activities:
Arts Camps: Arts and Crafts
Gender:
Coed
 

Summer Camps in Columbia, SC

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About Columbia, SC

Columbia is the state capital and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina. The population was 129,272 according to the 2010 census. Columbia is the county seat of Richland County, but a portion of the city extends into neighboring Lexington County. The city is the center of a metropolitan statistical area of 767,598, the largest within the state. The name Columbia was a poetic term for the Americas derived from Christopher Columbus.

Early history

From the creation of Columbia by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1786, the site of Columbia was important to the overall development of the state. The Congarees, a frontier fort on the west bank of the Congaree River, was the head of navigation in the Santee River system. A ferry was established by the colonial government in 1754 to connect the fort with the growing settlements on the higher ground on the east bank. Like many other significant early settlements in colonial America, Columbia is on the fall line from the Appalachian Mountains. The fall line is the spot where rivers usually become unnavigable when sailing upstream, and is also the spot farthest downstream where falling water can usefully power a mill. State Senator John Lewis Gervais of Ninety Six introduced a bill that was approved by the legislature on March 22, 1786, to create a new state capital. There was considerable...